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Any Cooks Onboard?

ChrisM

Mostly harmless.
1,139
1,331
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
3-5 Years
SoCal
While I was in Japan I became obsessed with the food. My favorites were beef gyudon (Japanese beef bowl), ramen (in particular the shoyu eggs that came with the bowls of ramen), and incredible cheap sushi. I don't have a recipe for sushi...but I was able to find an authentic beef gyudon recipe and perfected shoyu eggs, so I'll share those here.

Gyudon (this is not my recipe, but I did modify it to suit my tastes):
4 cups white rice (just use a rice cooker, rinse the rice well before cooking)
1 1/3 cups dashi soup (dry dashi mix can usually be found in any Asian market or the ethnic food section of most big name grocery stores)
5 tbsp soy sauce
3 tablespoons mirin (a kind of Japanese sweet liquid that can also be found in any Asian market or ethnic food section of most big name grocery stores)
1 tablespoon white sugar
1 teaspoon sake (optional...but fun...)
1 small onion, thinly sliced
1 pound very thinly sliced beef sirloin (I prefer shaved, I've had to ask the butchers for this because they don't usually sell it thin enough)
Pickled pink ginger for topping (near the mirin and dashi)
Japanese togarishi (a wonderful red chili spice, also usually near the mirin and dashi)

1. Combine dashi, soy sauce, mirin, sugar, and sake in a large saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat.
2. Add the onion and let it simmer until translucent.
3. Add the beef and simmer until no longer pink.
4. Divide rice equally between four bowls. Top with beef, onions, and however much of the broth you want. Add pinkled ginger and sprinkle with Japanese togarishi to add some great kick.

Goes great with a side of miso soup and a cabbage salad.

Shoyu (or ramen) eggs:
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
6 eggs
3/4 cup water
3 tablespoons soy sauce (I use low sodium soy sauce)
3 tablespoons mirin
1 teaspoon dark soy sauce (very potent flavor)

1. Prepare an ice bath (ice cubes and water) to cool the eggs as soon once they are done cooking.
2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add the rice vinegar (helps soften the shells a bit for easier peeling).
3. Place refrigerated eggs into the boiling water and cook for 6-7 minutes. I like mine to be medium-boiled for a nice custardy yolk. I also poke a very tiny hole in one end before placing in the pot (I prefer to use cold eggs as they don't seem to split as easily while cooking and are easier to peel at the end)
4. Remove eggs and immediately place in the ice bath to stop cooking and cool for 5-10 minutes.
5. Prepare the shoyu marinade by mixing the 3/4 cup water, soy sauce, mirin, and dark soy sauce in the container you will be storing the eggs in.
6. Peel the eggs. I roll the eggs on the counter and crack the shell all over before removing it. This helps separate the shell and lining from the whites and makes them easier to peel.
7. Place the eggs in the marinade in the fridge overnight. When they're done, they should be a nice even brown coloration all over.
8. Eat at your leisure!

They go great with ramen or other Asian soups. They stay good for at least 3-4 days. I've saved them for a week and been fine.
 
While I was in Japan I became obsessed with the food. My favorites were beef gyudon (Japanese beef bowl), ramen (in particular the shoyu eggs that came with the bowls of ramen), and incredible cheap sushi. I don't have a recipe for sushi...but I was able to find an authentic beef gyudon recipe and perfected shoyu eggs, so I'll share those here.

Gyudon (this is not my recipe, but I did modify it to suit my tastes):
4 cups white rice (just use a rice cooker, rinse the rice well before cooking)
1 1/3 cups dashi soup (dry dashi mix can usually be found in any Asian market or the ethnic food section of most big name grocery stores)
5 tbsp soy sauce
3 tablespoons mirin (a kind of Japanese sweet liquid that can also be found in any Asian market or ethnic food section of most big name grocery stores)
1 tablespoon white sugar
1 teaspoon sake (optional...but fun...)
1 small onion, thinly sliced
1 pound very thinly sliced beef sirloin (I prefer shaved, I've had to ask the butchers for this because they don't usually sell it thin enough)
Pickled pink ginger for topping (near the mirin and dashi)
Japanese togarishi (a wonderful red chili spice, also usually near the mirin and dashi)

1. Combine dashi, soy sauce, mirin, sugar, and sake in a large saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat.
2. Add the onion and let it simmer until translucent.
3. Add the beef and simmer until no longer pink.
4. Divide rice equally between four bowls. Top with beef, onions, and however much of the broth you want. Add pinkled ginger and sprinkle with Japanese togarishi to add some great kick.

Goes great with a side of miso soup and a cabbage salad.

Shoyu (or ramen) eggs:
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
6 eggs
3/4 cup water
3 tablespoons soy sauce (I use low sodium soy sauce)
3 tablespoons mirin
1 teaspoon dark soy sauce (very potent flavor)

1. Prepare an ice bath (ice cubes and water) to cool the eggs as soon once they are done cooking.
2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add the rice vinegar (helps soften the shells a bit for easier peeling).
3. Place refrigerated eggs into the boiling water and cook for 6-7 minutes. I like mine to be medium-boiled for a nice custardy yolk. I also poke a very tiny hole in one end before placing in the pot (I prefer to use cold eggs as they don't seem to split as easily while cooking and are easier to peel at the end)
4. Remove eggs and immediately place in the ice bath to stop cooking and cool for 5-10 minutes.
5. Prepare the shoyu marinade by mixing the 3/4 cup water, soy sauce, mirin, and dark soy sauce in the container you will be storing the eggs in.
6. Peel the eggs. I roll the eggs on the counter and crack the shell all over before removing it. This helps separate the shell and lining from the whites and makes them easier to peel.
7. Place the eggs in the marinade in the fridge overnight. When they're done, they should be a nice even brown coloration all over.
8. Eat at your leisure!

They go great with ramen or other Asian soups. They stay good for at least 3-4 days. I've saved them for a week and been fine.

thanks for sharing Chris, def giving these a go.
 
wife bought have a bushel of peaches.. so... I made a blueberry & peach pie... with a brown betty topping.. butter sugar flour cinnamon oatmeal rice crispies etc..

View attachment 76650
I just got up. Send some over for breakfast please. And - yes - I don't care if it's 5:30 am , that delicious delight will get treated properly with ice cream and whipped cream.
 

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