The Mustang Forum for Track & Racing Enthusiasts

Taking your Mustang to an open track/HPDE event for the first time? Do you race competitively? This forum is for you! Log in to remove most ads.

  • Welcome to the Ford Mustang forum built for owners of the Mustang GT350, BOSS 302, GT500, and all other S550, S197, SN95, Fox Body and older Mustangs set up for open track days, road racing, and/or autocross. Join our forum, interact with others, share your build, and help us strengthen this community!

Suggestions for track compound brake pads? S550 PP1

16
12
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
20+ Years
Ontario, Canada

2021 Mustang PP1 (Brembos).
In this video the car has Pirelli P-Zeros and stock camber. Needs more camber and better tire. Check.

I also learned track pads are a must. This track was Shannonville and in the video you can see a lot of shorter braking events, and a poor and inconsistent driver at the wheel. ;)

I also plan on running Mosport (CTMP) GP track which if I remember from my E30 and 94 Camaro have two big braking zones (end of back straight and corner 5a).

Would I use the same pad compound for these two tracks?

SECOND: The rear caliper I had to replace as the dust boot had torn when I replaced the rear pads. The boots seem very thin, so can I get away with running a track pad full time on the rear to avoid having to move the piston in and risk tearing another boot and having to replace the caliper? I know that I will chew up the rotor some and have to live with some noise?

Appreciate all the advice.
 
1,084
1,035
In the V6L

2021 Mustang PP1 (Brembos).
In this video the car has Pirelli P-Zeros and stock camber. Needs more camber and better tire. Check.

I also learned track pads are a must. This track was Shannonville and in the video you can see a lot of shorter braking events, and a poor and inconsistent driver at the wheel. ;)

I also plan on running Mosport (CTMP) GP track which if I remember from my E30 and 94 Camaro have two big braking zones (end of back straight and corner 5a).

Would I use the same pad compound for these two tracks?

SECOND: The rear caliper I had to replace as the dust boot had torn when I replaced the rear pads. The boots seem very thin, so can I get away with running a track pad full time on the rear to avoid having to move the piston in and risk tearing another boot and having to replace the caliper? I know that I will chew up the rotor some and have to live with some noise?

Appreciate all the advice.
On the brakes thing, you'll get a lot of folks giving you advice on the latest and greatest track pads, so stand by. There are lots of "track day" pads out there now, many are value-priced and most work pretty well, although the problem with many is that if they can stand the heat, they can't stand the cold. Or vice-versa.

My advice on the rear would be to spend a little extra on a set of Pagid RSL29's (shape is 8204, I think for the Mustang PP) then install them and check them occasionally to see how they're wearing. They're an endurance pad that have a strong following in pro racing - they've been at this for years. The advantage of having RSL29's at the back are threefold - first, they're a real race pad and can take the heat. Second, they work fine on the street. Third, they're easy on the disks even when they're cold. Back when I ran iron brakes, I just put a set in and drove them until they wore out after a bunch of track days and trips to the office. A side benefit is that they make a soft brown dust that's easy to clean - it doesn't turn to rock if it gets wet.

One thing that drives wear on the rear is the driving mode. I don't know what modes your car has, but if there's no "track" mode, you'll burn through rear pads fast because that's how the stability control system keeps you out of trouble. Another thing to consider is front deflector plates if your car didn't come with them. Vorshlag can help with that - you could order them at the same time you pick up a set of their camber plates.
 
16
12
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
20+ Years
Ontario, Canada
On the brakes thing, you'll get a lot of folks giving you advice on the latest and greatest track pads, so stand by. There are lots of "track day" pads out there now, many are value-priced and most work pretty well, although the problem with many is that if they can stand the heat, they can't stand the cold. Or vice-versa.

My advice on the rear would be to spend a little extra on a set of Pagid RSL29's (shape is 8204, I think for the Mustang PP) then install them and check them occasionally to see how they're wearing. They're an endurance pad that have a strong following in pro racing - they've been at this for years. The advantage of having RSL29's at the back are threefold - first, they're a real race pad and can take the heat. Second, they work fine on the street. Third, they're easy on the disks even when they're cold. Back when I ran iron brakes, I just put a set in and drove them until they wore out after a bunch of track days and trips to the office. A side benefit is that they make a soft brown dust that's easy to clean - it doesn't turn to rock if it gets wet.

One thing that drives wear on the rear is the driving mode. I don't know what modes your car has, but if there's no "track" mode, you'll burn through rear pads fast because that's how the stability control system keeps you out of trouble. Another thing to consider is front deflector plates if your car didn't come with them. Vorshlag can help with that - you could order them at the same time you pick up a set of their camber plates.

Appreciate this. The traction control still intervened in track mode, though probably less. I know this because I used it for 3/4 sessions and that is when the rear brake temps were the highest. When I took traction and stability control off entirely the rear brakes were much cooler. I didn't see any lights on the dash, but the Pirellis lost traction a lot during normal driving, I can only imagine what they were doing coming out of the corners, even with the Torsen???

I'll look at the Pagids.
 
179
141
MD
Don’t know how much you are willing to spend but I know the GLOC R12/10 (front/rear) is pretty popular. I have been running it for 2 years. Also you can run their street pads GS-1 without having to sand or change rotors.
The rear caliper boot tear I know is common. I did the same right before my last track event. From what I read as long as fluid isn’t coming out (even with that tear it shouldn’t) you are fine. I thought I had to replace the caliper
 
419
433
Exp. Type
W2W Racing
Exp. Level
20+ Years
Snowy North
Talk with @JDee...and take his advice to heart. Learn from someone who knows the car, those tracks and has more seat time than a NYC cabbie.

And btw...stability control usually only intervenes significantly while you're climbing the learning curve....so use it positively to improve your skills and smoothness. Also, it can be your friend at Mosport, especially on hot OE Pirellis or in the damp :oops:. Not many soft landing spots at the big track lolol.
 
Last edited:
100
44
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
5-10 Years
So CA
Don’t know how much you are willing to spend but I know the GLOC R12/10 (front/rear) is pretty popular. I have been running it for 2 years. Also you can run their street pads GS-1 without having to sand or change rotors.
The rear caliper boot tear I know is common. I did the same right before my last track event. From what I read as long as fluid isn’t coming out (even with that tear it shouldn’t) you are fine. I thought I had to replace the caliper

I’m installing this same combo soon, heard good feedback from GLOC users. Any experience with Ferodo?
 
43
23
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
10-20 Years
Fresno, ca
My understanding is that G-loc was developed by a guy that defected from Carbotech so should be the same.
That means fantastic pads that can be swapped without cleaning discs first. We used to swap from Bobcats to xp 12/10 and back again with no problems.
My issue with them was price.
G-Lock fixes that.
Great pads IMO.
 

Bill Pemberton

0ld Ford Automotive Racing Terror
6,425
5,326
Exp. Type
W2W Racing
Exp. Level
20+ Years
Blair, Nebraska
There was no defection from Carbotech, just two brothers from the family that owned Carbotech decided to go on their own. Both are solid products, pretty darn easy on pads , but in my years of selling and using both pads make sure you get them prebedded. For those going to really fast tracks I am not sure a R12 is in the cards if you are mega -aggressive ( like I am ). You are lucky because you have Optimum Performance, KNS Brakes, and EBC as sponsors here, so consider contacting them, letting them know the tracks you run, and get their advice -- it is their business.

I like the modulation offered by a bit more gap in the pad temp. gradients. If you go with a 12, consider putting an 8 in the back, so they heat up quicker. This could give you more balance in pad usage as the darn rear rotors of the Stang often do not appear to get much usage ( and you want them to help with the braking ,not just go along for the ride)

PS - keep in mind the Carbotech pad numbers and the G-Loc pad numbers are not identical. For instance a 24 with Carbotech is an 18 with G-Loc.
 
19
7
Exp. Type
W2W Racing
Exp. Level
Under 3 Years
Washington
I'm curious on the mention of swapping in the GLOC street pads and still working after using R12/R10s. Im still evolving my brakes understanding over the past couple years(whats a pain to do, whats works, etc.). Last year I moved to using R10/R8 combo, works well, but I think Im faster now and they get cooked in pretty good by the end of the session. I was running in sport mode this last year with creeping into track mode, so I know running in sport mode is likely cooking the brakes more.

My system to date has been, I have two sets of stock rotors, one for my Glocs, the other set for my street Hawk ceramic pads(which are pretty nice actually). I can do the change in a little over an hour so its not terrible, but just changing pads would save me some wrenching. So, if I'm reading the thread here correctly, if I move up to R12/R10s this year, and also buy some of their street pads, I can just run pad swaps and I shouldnt have to do any major pad bedding each time?
 
138
87
Exp. Type
Time Attack
Exp. Level
Under 3 Years
Bulgaria
Yes but to be fair I'm running my DS2500 with my R10/R8 and so far no big issue with ether of the pads and considering how cheap blank disks are compared to pads I don't see the reason to be so careful regarding disks. Overall is working great for me.
 
179
141
MD
I'm curious on the mention of swapping in the GLOC street pads and still working after using R12/R10s. Im still evolving my brakes understanding over the past couple years(whats a pain to do, whats works, etc.). Last year I moved to using R10/R8 combo, works well, but I think Im faster now and they get cooked in pretty good by the end of the session. I was running in sport mode this last year with creeping into track mode, so I know running in sport mode is likely cooking the brakes more.

My system to date has been, I have two sets of stock rotors, one for my Glocs, the other set for my street Hawk ceramic pads(which are pretty nice actually). I can do the change in a little over an hour so its not terrible, but just changing pads would save me some wrenching. So, if I'm reading the thread here correctly, if I move up to R12/R10s this year, and also buy some of their street pads, I can just run pad swaps and I shouldnt have to do any major pad bedding each time?
Yup. That is correct. You can run the GS1 pads on the same rotors as the track pads. I plan to do that this year because my OEM pads are almost done after 4 years
 
43
23
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
10-20 Years
Fresno, ca
I'm curious on the mention of swapping in the GLOC street pads and still working after using R12/R10s. Im still evolving my brakes understanding over the past couple years(whats a pain to do, whats works, etc.). Last year I moved to using R10/R8 combo, works well, but I think Im faster now and they get cooked in pretty good by the end of the session. I was running in sport mode this last year with creeping into track mode, so I know running in sport mode is likely cooking the brakes more.

My system to date has been, I have two sets of stock rotors, one for my Glocs, the other set for my street Hawk ceramic pads(which are pretty nice actually). I can do the change in a little over an hour so its not terrible, but just changing pads would save me some wrenching. So, if I'm reading the thread here correctly, if I move up to R12/R10s this year, and also buy some of their street pads, I can just run pad swaps and I shouldnt have to do any major pad bedding each time?
I can also confirm. Not only are Carbotech and G-loc great pads, but you can swap back and forth street to track. It's a great benefit.
 
100
44
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
5-10 Years
So CA
No problems swapping, also concur. Maybe just use 80 grit to scrub off the bedded stuff before putting the track pads back on. What I noticed after a track day is, the R12/R10 pads were not that bad dust-wise compared to prior Hawk DTs
 

Bill Pemberton

0ld Ford Automotive Racing Terror
6,425
5,326
Exp. Type
W2W Racing
Exp. Level
20+ Years
Blair, Nebraska
I agree with trackdao and kaj, still scrub off the rotors a bit before reinstalling --- a little grit, a little brake clean, and little sweat and a little dry, equals solid bedding.
 
43
23
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
10-20 Years
Fresno, ca
No problems swapping, also concur. Maybe just use 80 grit to scrub off the bedded stuff before putting the track pads back on. What I noticed after a track day is, the R12/R10 pads were not that bad dust-wise compared to prior Hawk DTs
Agreed. Carbotech/G-loc are very good in terms of dust and rotor life.
 
19
7
Exp. Type
W2W Racing
Exp. Level
Under 3 Years
Washington
Thinking out loud though. If honing the rotors is a need to make for a clean bedding process (which totally makes sense), just flat out swapping rotors might be just as efficient to be honest. One set of rotors for the track pads, one set for the street. Just thinking the process of breaking bolts and reinstalling rotors is probably more efficient than honing rotors each time. It's easy with a drill to do it, just thinking about the time/effort required to do that. Still dialing in the approach here so correct me if I'm thinking about it wrong.
 

TMO Supporting Vendors

Latest posts

Buy TMO Apparel

Buy TMO Apparel
Top