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Vorshlag Camber Plate Question

Just a reminder, if you want to compete in SCCA autocross, grinding/cutting the strut opening in the shock tower for clearance (or any other reason) moves you up several categories. Don't know about the NASA class rules. I'd say leave it stock for now.
That's my plan for now. The shop that I went to said we could make adjustments to the tower down the road. I'm new so think the 3 degrees should keep me pretty good for some time. Who knows maybe the wear and tire temps might be ok where it's at. I just want to learn and have some fun at hpde's right now. No even thinking about anything official.

Thanks!
 
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45
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HPDE
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Under 3 Years
Ann Arbor, MI
Perhaps someone from Vorshlag could chime in on this thread, or point us to an already existing one. It would be great to clarify installation and the challenges we might face doing this on our own, as well as the basics of making changes from the track to the street. Practical info would be best for many of us who have heard about the value of their product but don’t wrench on cars all that often.
 
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I'm not Vorshlag but have I used and loved their camber plates on and off track, year round daily driver, for about 90,000 miles. I bought them pre-assembled as part of their StreetPro package so install was easy. They are over-built and super sturdy. If you are buying just the camber plates you will need a spring compressor and the same tools and skills as doing a front strut replacement. No unique challenges in my experience.

Changing from street to track? For street, as said, make sure both wheels are in the air. Put camber plates in max upright position and set front toe to zero so you don't get weird or excessive tire wear. Then on track days, both wheels in air, just move to camber plate to max negative camber (the top of the strut will hit the inside edge of the strut opening; you can back it off a smidge to avoid rubbing), enjoy the day, and put back to full upright when done and going home. 5 minutes, most of which is jacking the car.

A side benefit is that because of the steering geometry when you move the cc plates to max neg camber you also create a toe out alignment, which makes for nice sharp turn-in on the track. Win-win.

When I asked Vorshlag how much negative camber I should use for track days, the guy on the phone laughed and said "all of it." That is what I've done and it's worked great. CC plates are an awesome mod. Enjoy.
 
The previous responses have covered the issues pretty well.
Yes, it might be stiff if the swaybar is binding. Just jack it up a little to adjust the plates.
Yes, if you jam the shaft or nut into the edge of the sheet metal, it will get chewed up from the figure eight movement the top of the shaft makes during suspension movement.
Yes, with an otherwise stock-ish suspension strut and spring, you will need all the camber you can get on track.
And yes, SCCA will boot you into a heavy-prep class if you modify the towers. NASA doesn't care.
 
With these plates (on S550) can I adjust the camber to max and skip an alignment after? And same for the rear camber, where I’m fully stock? And what about torque specs front and rear? I thought I read just 17-lbs front, but can’t seem to find it now. Thanks!
 
1,025
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In the V6L
With these plates (on S550) can I adjust the camber to max and skip an alignment after? And same for the rear camber, where I’m fully stock? And what about torque specs front and rear? I thought I read just 17-lbs front, but can’t seem to find it now. Thanks!
No and no. The front toe changes with camber, so you need to reset the toe after a camber adjustment. The rear camber is worse - it's vastly harder to adjust in the first place and it really changes the toe a lot. The factory torque setting for the front strut top bolts is 46 ft-lbs, and it's likely that Vorshlag's torque will be in that range. At the rear, the inner control arm bolt (where you adjust camber) is 85 ft-lbs and it must be torqued with the suspension loaded at static ride height.
 
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@JAJ, double check but I don't think that is correct. At least on the S197 you can align the suspension for street driving with the CC plates in the full upright position, zero toe, and then when you go to the track just move them to full negative camber without a further alignment. The adjustment to full negative camber will cause a toe out condition but that works well for the track. Then just return them to the original upright/zero toe setting at the end of the day.

The torque specs for the CC plate bolts is very low, like around 15 lbs if I recall correctly. Vorshlag has lots of warnings about not over-tightening, they can break easily.
 
1,025
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@JAJ, double check but I don't think that is correct. At least on the S197 you can align the suspension for street driving with the CC plates in the full upright position, zero toe, and then when you go to the track just move them to full negative camber without a further alignment. The adjustment to full negative camber will cause a toe out condition but that works well for the track. Then just return them to the original upright/zero toe setting at the end of the day.

The torque specs for the CC plate bolts is very low, like around 15 lbs if I recall correctly. Vorshlag has lots of warnings about not over-tightening, they can break easily.
Okay, the S197 later years don't have a problem when you change the camber on the front. But, you asked about rear camber. There is no rear camber adjustment on the S197 - it's a solid rear axle. So, which version of the Mustang are you asking about?

As for the torque specs, low numbers like 15 lb-ft are great until the camber rearranges itself as you go around a corner. Ask Vorshlag.
 

JDee

Ancient Racer
1,334
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20+ Years
halfway between Mosport and Shannonville
Personally, I don't know why people worry about running a lot of negative camber on the street. I did that when I was still street driving the car a lot and it had zero effect on tire wear, bit of increase in tramlining on really rutted roads was about the extent of it. Really, the damage from 1 day at the track to the tires is more than you'd get in 30K street miles.

When I was racing no good team I knew of would ever change anything in the alignment without doing a full re-check of all the alignment settings.
 
Okay, the S197 later years don't have a problem when you change the camber on the front. But, you asked about rear camber. There is no rear camber adjustment on the S197 - it's a solid rear axle. So, which version of the Mustang are you asking about?

As for the torque specs, low numbers like 15 lb-ft are great until the camber rearranges itself as you go around a corner. Ask Vorshlag.
It was me who asked the questions, not stevbd. I’m not looking to switch camber back once I go full negative, so I will get an alignment after front and rear are adjusted and leave it there. I assume any competent alignment shop can adjust the Vorshlags and the stock rear, then do an alignment. I’ll check with Vorshlag on torque spec.
Really appreciate the reply - Thanks!
 
Those M8 studs on the S197 camber plates should be torqued to 18 lb-ft.
The M10 studs on the S550 camber plates should be torqued to 35 lb-ft.

If you break a stud, replacement bolt rings with studs are available on the Vorshlag site.
S197
S550
 
Those M8 studs on the S197 camber plates should be torqued to 18 lb-ft.
The M10 studs on the S550 camber plates should be torqued to 35 lb-ft.

If you break a stud, replacement bolt rings with studs are available on the Vorshlag site.
S197
S550
Thanks, but I’m confused. The S550 bolt ring link says 18 lbs, not 35 lbs. Which is correct?
 
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I would go with the post from the guy who has worked at Vorshlag for year and posted links and pics to their specifications. See above.
@TMSBOSS, totally agree but the confusion is that Jason from Vorshlag said 35 lb-ft for the s550 in his post above while their website says 18 lb-ft.

I'm definitely not trying to argue with anyone. From Jason's reply it appears Vorshlag went to stronger hardware on the s550 CC plates and @JAJ was pretty much correct in his torque recommendation. I was only familiar with the material on Vorshlag's site, but it appears it has a typo that needs to be corrected. And yes, I have a s197 and was only talking about the front CC plates, not the rear suspension. Sorry for any confusion and carry on!
 

TMSBOSS

Spending my pension on car parts and track fees.
6,362
3,445
Exp. Type
HPDE
Exp. Level
5-10 Years
Illinois
Ford went to a larger fastener making it easier for the after market to follow suit. Vorshlag and other after market manufacturers were saddled with using the smaller weaker fasteners on the earlier generation. When it broke, everyone blamed the after market. Yes they made the part, they did not engineer the part originally? Ford made the part to go in once and stay put. The smaller diameter fasteners worked great for that purpose. Clamping force needed to hold an adjustable plate pushed the smaller studs.
Typos happen. I try to look at the fasteners and determine torque from there. Standard bolt sizes and grades have a set torque. I have a chart in my tool box which I use as a general guide. Works well. And yes, I have watched folks twist off a bolt because they miss read the application of had the wrong location. Read the bolt first. My two cents.
 

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